Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3
, is a frequent guest on "morning joe" to discuss foreign policies and world affairs. but this spring she came to us with her own memoir. "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." in it, she tells of prague in one of its darkest chapters, the breakout of world war ii, when at just 2 years old, she was forced to flee czechoslovakia with her family. hearse is an immigrant story like so many others, including my mother's and fathers. whose birthday, my father's, will never forget. you've got a really good memory. she's the author of the new memoir of "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." this book is amazing. >> and speaking of the brzezinskis, you know, it's amazing how much dr. brzezinski's life was shaped by the fact that they fled warsaw right before the uprising and mrs. brzezinski, of course, had to flee czechoslovakia, just like you. and you actually talked about in a debate that rose up about colin powell and his view of the world, polilus -- versus your v of the world, how your view was shaped by your childhood. >> t
a half of his face because he's brilliant domestically, troubled on foreign policy. but he had a good side image so i think you could have half of him. >> can you do that? >> they can do do anything they want. >> she's the one -- >> half a face. >> so we've already talked about fdr. we've talked about truman. let's talk about reagan, a guy who when many people on the left thought he stumbled into office as an accident of history, few could expect this guy to be as transformative as he was. i would guess most historians 100 years from now will talk about the 20th century, they'll talk about fdr and reagan. >> well, there's no question. having created -- i mean, fdr creating a generation of liberal followers and reagan creating a generation of conservative followers, changing the whole idea of what we thought about government, whether one agrees or not, dealing with the cold war, being able to finally bring about that partnership with gorbachev, you know, take that wall down, the strength he showed, the communication ability, the fact that people felt optimistic during his time, the fac
on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is -- so we don't have to employ the phrase "fiscal cliff" at all during the day? any ideas? anybody got any -- >> how about deadline? >> how about do your job. how about just do your job time. it is ridiculous. a little news, then we'll chatter about this. as if tax hikes and spending cuts weren't enough, there's a new reminder that the nation's debt ceiling is also hanging over the budget talks in washington. in a letter to congress yesterday, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which thr
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3